Tag: Personal development

Why we fail to reach our goals and what to do about it

If you’ve ever read a personal development book, I’m sure you’ve come across the importance of goal-setting. Everyone and his brother seems to lament the importance of setting big goals, shooting for the moon and going all in.

This might be one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard.

Not only does this not work, but it is actually counter-productive and demotivating according to this study.

Humans are creatures of habit, and our habits are most often based on what’s easy for us to do. What this means is that if we want to accomplish anything, we need to make sure our goal is something which doesn’t take an enormous amount of effort to do, and that it is mostly within our own control.

For instance – you can’t control whether or not you become the next Jimi Hendrix, but you can control whether you practice playing the guitar for 30 minutes each day. Playing for 30 minutes each day is achievable, within your control, and adds up over time, and those elements are the keys to achieving anything worthwhile, so let me repeat it for good measure.

If your goals are achievable and within your control they will add up to a lot over time. The reason why so many fail to do this, is because we overreach – we want to achieve our goals tomorrow, and become the greatest in the world within an unrealistically short time frame.

This is also the reason why we’re so fascinated by the people who achieve outsized success, because we subconsciously recognize that what they have achieved is super-human, insofar that they have had to circumvent their natural wiring in order to get to where they are today.

While we may not see the thousands of hours in the gym, or the frustrating hours in front of the computer trying to write something worthwhile or excel at making spreadsheets (sorry), we recognize that the people who have truly mastered a given subject have put in an immense amount of effort in order to do so, and the whole point here is that so can we – as long as we take sufficiently small steps, and practice our craft diligently and persistently

You might already be at a point in your career where you are well on your way to mastering a subject and you just need a little nudge to make the final leap to complete mastery. Or maybe you are in the beginning of your journey and you’re feeling all jittery or excited, or maybe you’re in what Seth Godin calls the Dip – the point where you’ve achieved some progress and then stalled, because the effort required to reach the next level is more than you’re able or willing to put in right now.

Whatever your case, keep in mind that making your goal achievable and within your control is the first step to making enormous progress, but it is going to take a long time, and we must realize this if we want to achieve anything worthwhile.

As long as we’re stuck in the mindset that we have to achieve large goals in a short period of time, we will keep falling into the same trap and give up every time we encounter adversity, because we feel like we should be able reach our goal almost effortlessly.

In reality however, overcoming adversity is one of the best indicators for high achievement, but that’s a subject for another post.

For now, suffice it to say that when you know what you want, you have to figure out one action you can repeat day in and day out that will move you closer to your goal.

On What’s Important And How to Say No

The realization that in the history of the human race, no one has ever survived old age is a profound one. Now, this doesn’t mean that we won’t eventually find a cure for ageing, and in my opinion Tim Urban has explained this beautifully. Let’s just for arguments sake however, say that we are not going to live forever, which means that we will someday run out of time in this beautiful world.

That means, that we have to make it very clear to ourselves what’s important to us. What’s going to matter, when we look back on our life? Will it matter what title we have at our company? Or will it matter that we had a lot of fun while we worked, and we got to spend our time with amazing people? Maybe we can do both. But I know which one is more important to me.

When we realize that our time is finite, we also inevitably realize that the extra hour or two we spend working, might not be worth it, if it means missing time with our fiancee, missed snuggles with our cat, a missed workout or whatever might else might be more important to us. Don’t get me wrong – if work is what’s most important to you, then by all means spend all the time you can doing it. I have a close friend who loves his job – and I’m fairly sure he would rather work than not, because it gives him an intense sense of satisfaction, and I still love him all the same.

My point is that our best course of action is to prioritize consciously, so that we don’t end up getting roped into things which we derive no pleasure from. We want to spend our time on the things which brings us the most value. This doesn’t mean skipping out on family get-togethers or only doing things which you want to do, but it does mean that we can say No without feeling bad or guilty. It means that we need to figure out if other people’s opinion are important to us, and if so, why?

Here’s the main point: I can’t decide what’s important for you. I can only decide what I find important and that only applies to me. If I can pass along a single idea from this post it is this:

Decide what is important to you and what is not, and make your best effort to spend your time according to that decision.

The Three Most Powerful Anti-Depressants I Know

Many people in my family suffer from depression. My grandmothers on both sides were severely affected by depression and my father’s mother used to be bedridden for weeks at a time when she was still alive.

My father suffered severely from depression, and would go months where he was unable to function. Throughout his life he’s struggled with a number of mental health issues over the years and sadly it has opened up a gulf between us – and while I forgive him, I do not wish to spend my time with him.

The reason I mention my family-tree is deeply tainted with depression, is to highlight the fact, that luckily I’ve been spared, which is more unlikely than not, given the history in my family.  Now because, I’m an only child, I don’t have any siblings to study as a control group, but I do believe that there are several other reasons which explains my fortunate mental health, because clearly it is not explained by my genetic makeup.

First and foremost I believe that every person has a higher degree of control over their outlook on life, than we give ourselves credit for. I believe that we can choose to view the world in any number of ways, and if we make a conscious effort, we can choose to look for the upside in any given situation and cultivate an overall positive outlook on life as a result.

My personal experience is that it’s highly effective in combating depression and severe mood-swings, simply because it is fairly difficult to focus on what’s good in your life and on what’s bad in your life simultaneously. I realize that there are more nuances to clinical depression than just thinking bad thoughts, but my experience is that if we consciously look for upside in our lives, we are likely to find it.

Thankfully, science has my back – it’s called the Tetris effect.

Another element which contributes significantly to any persons well-being – I’m no exception – is regular exercise. We’re not talking about ultra-runs or Iron Men or bodybuilder physiques – we’re just talking about moving your body a little every day. I’ve found that doing so is incredibly helpful in terms of warding off any negative emotions. On my best days and my worst days, I’ve always found exercise to be an incredible mood-lifter and it doesn’t matter if it’s going for a run, lifting weights, rowing, biking or simply walking – moving my body around lifts my spirits significantly, regardless of how I do it.

The final habit, which I believe is the most powerful one of the three, is the habit of journaling. Specifically the habit of writing down 3-5 things every day, which I’m grateful for. I’m aware that this can come across as cheesy, and overly simplistic, but I dare you to try it, and tell me the results.

In my experience there is nothing more powerful than expressing my gratitude each and every single day.

Not only does this habit make me focus on the positive and so gives me a double-whammy on the Tetris effect, but it also forces me to look for things, for which I am grateful throughout the day, which helps me find them. In my mind, journaling has a number of added benefits on the side as well such as enhanced creativity, better ideas and it makes it easier to connect with others.

The point here is that journaling – and specifically journaling for gratitude – is an insanely powerful tool, and I believe you will find it to work wonders for you if you give it a try.

In summary…

… If you need a mood lift, or if you feel like you’re stuck in a rut, or even if you feel severely depressed – maybe even clinically so try any combination of the following

  • Look for the upside
  • Move your body
  • Express your gratitude

All the best

Nick

Philosophy and The Art of Living Your Best Life

My guess is this post will get very few readers – fewer readers than normal that is – simply because philosophy is a term which invokes such strong associations of people who are too similar to the grad student with the pony tail in Good Will Hunting.

Image result for harvard bar scene

In a word?

Cunt.

Philosophy in its original form has nothing to do with how we’ve come to think of it today – philosophy in its original form has everything to do with the art of living well, the art of living your best life.

Now, there are as many ways to go about living as there are people on this planet – which was about 7.6 billion at the time of this writing – but very few of us give any thought to how we want to live and what constitutes an optimal life.

From an evolutionary standpoint this makes complete and utter sense. Who gives a fuck about how to live? What makes sense to care about is amassing as many resources as possible, so that we can pass our genes on to the next generation as successfully as possible. And this is exactly how most people live.

I do think however, that in order to live our best life, we must consider which principles we want to live according to – and in order to determine which principles are worth adhering to, philosophy comes in handy.

One of the principles I live according to, is that we’re all continually evolving, and I don’t want to set who I am too much in stone, because I believe our minds are too dynamic for that. I believe that in order to be the best we can be, we must be open to new ideas, continually learn and evolve.

Another principle which is important to me, is the idea that time is valuable – not in the sense that time is money – but in the sense that time is the only non-renewable resource in the world, and therefore it makes sense to be careful how we spend it, and with whom.

The final principle I want to mention is that it makes sense for each one of us to think for ourselves.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to hold a contrarian opinion, just for the sake of it, but I do want to think independently about the things I choose to think about.

This means that if I either don’t have an opinion on a subject, or I have a strong opinion on a subject, because I’ve considered all the available facts and thought about it deeply. Now there is a natural limit to how much deep thinking any one person can do, so my strong opinions are naturally fairly limited.

This also means however, that my opinions are subject to change, when the facts change, because I don’t want to be married to my opinion. I want to be able to change my opinion, when I see evidence that is contrary to that opinion.

On this topic I agree wholeheartedly with Emerson, when he says that “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds”.

There are countless other principles to think about and philosophical alleyways to go down, and my aim is to explore a few of them through my writing – and I hope you’ll join me on this journey.

Want more time? 2000 year old advice on time management that still works wonders

“People are frugal in guarding their personal property; but as soon as it comes to squandering time they are most wasteful of the one thing in which it is right to be stingy.”

– Seneca

The quality of our life is determined almost exclusively by how we spend our time. If we want to live better lives, we must improve how we spend our time. Simple as that.

If we want to do better and be better, we must become better at consciously deciding how to spend our time, and this goes back to decisions we make about how we work, sleep, rest, how we spend our free time, who we spend our time with and the environments that we place ourselves in.

As Seneca points out in On The Shortness of Life the problem for most of us, is not that we don’t have enough time – it’s that we don’t know how to spend the time that we do have well enough.

If we constantly fritter away our time at work and in our spare time, it’s no wonder we fee overwhelmed.

If we let others encroach on our time instead of guarding it vigilantly, then of course we’re going to feel stressed out, and like we don’t have enough time to do all the things we feel like we have to.

If instead we make a conscious choice of how many hours each day we’ll spend on any given task, then we will have a map of what to do, when to do it, as well as how much time we can afford to ‘waste’ on things like watching cat videos – because shit, cat videos are the bomb. My point is that it’s not about becoming a time-hoarding calendar nazi who only has 12 minutes to drink coffee with their mother every other Wednesday. Instead it’s about being aware of the choices we make, and make sure that we set aside time for our top priorities, and ensure that we figure out a way to do the things which are most important to usIt’s about being aware that if we make better choices about how we spend our time, then we will get better outcomes.

You don’t need more motivation – what you need is discipline

A lot of happiness in life comes from the ability to self-direct our efforts. In other words, if we want to be happy, it’s a good idea to figure out a way to make a living from something where we have considerable influence on what we do.

Most artistic pursuits fit this category. So does writing. So does a million other professions – but the point is, if we want to make ourselves a life where we choose to be self-directed, we must realize that only doing it when we feel motivated is not enough. We have to show up whether we feel like it or not.

This is even truer if you are trying to make a living in a profession where there is not necessarily an obvious path. Or at least where most people’s path is different. And it is especially true if you strike out in a profession where you have to work for 0 income for a while, or even have to put money into the endeavor with little to nothing to show for it like most inventors.

The essence of this brief blog post is that you don’t need motivation. What you need is discipline to show up every day and do the work whether you feel like it or not.

Once you have that discipline, you’re all set to strike out on your own.

Are you ready to forgive?

I’ve had some weird experiences in my life – I’ve had some ups and some downs, made a few enemies but even more friends. I’ve been an asshole, and I’ve been assholed against.

And you know what? It all passes.

Forgive and forget.

Life goes on.

The quicker we forgive, the quicker we move on. This forgiveness goes for others, but it certainly goes for ourselves. Sometimes it can be hard to forgive ourselves for things we did in the past, but hating ourselves is not going to solve the problem – only diving deeply into the situation with yourself and anyone afflicted will.

Of course there are some wounds which are deeper than others, and they might take longer to forgive, but we must never lose sight of how powerful forgiveness is.

The longer we hold a grudge, the more we suffer – this goes for ourselves as well as for others.

We must ask of ourselves that we forgive. We must demand it.